SANTA FE

Touch the country [of New Mexico] and you will never be the same again. — D. H. Lawrence, c. 1917

Polarized Microscopy of Chemical Crystals by Doug Craft

These are images taken of chemical crystals using a Nikon polarizing microscope from 2004-2006. I prepared slides of melt crystals of phenol (carbolic acid) and benzoic acid, and precipitation crystals of ascorbic acid and potassium acid phthalate. Crystal will form vivid colors in a polarizing microscope as you can see this video. The music is a piece called “Impermanence,” I composed in 2011 using Acid Pro.

Micro Biological by Doug Craft

These are biological subjects I photographed using an Olympus Stereo microscope with a Nikon F camera, and a Nikon polarizing microscope. The music is a piece composed in Acid Pro called, “Before Current Era.” Enjoy, and feel free to share! I shot images of S. Mark Nelson’s butterfly collection and leaf samples using the Olypmus dissection scope, and the prepared biological slides using a Nikon polarizing microscope.

17 Chihuly

These are photos I took with Instagram on my cell phone of the Chihuly exhibit on a recent trip to Seattle. (August 2018)

BIG IDEAS IN SCIENCE, ART, AND SOCIETY

Hello fellow space-time travelers. My name is Roger Jones. I am coming to you from steamy downtown Pensacola, Florida. It is 7:30 in the morning in late June, so you can see the morning sun streaming through the east-facing windows behind me. This is the first post on this channel, TheX-Press channel, so I thought…

THE (NOT ART) EXPERIMENT

At any rate, let’s get back to why we are having this conversation. We are here to use the language of art to search for a boundary between Art and (Not Art) in a real example. Surprises occur at boundaries. Surprises are the basis of humor. So … we might know when we are close to a boundary between Art and (Not Art) when we start laughing.

WHAT IS (NOT ART)?

Systems of knowledge have languages associated with themselves. The language can be a natural language, mathematical language, or even artistic language. We can say that each of these closed knowledge systems has big holes in it. There are true things that the knowledge system will never know. Any system of knowledge is like a great sponge with structure, but that is full of holes. Knowledge does not expand like a bit of perfume into a room. It expands like an interconnected sponge skeleton of knowledge.